Tracy Schroeder

Biography

Tracy Schroeder joined Boston University as Vice President of Information Services and Technology in July 2009. In that capacity she has responsibility for networking and telecommunications, systems infrastructure, communication and collaboration services, enterprise information systems, teaching and learning technologies, research computing, information security, and client computing support. While at BU, Tracy has worked to improve technology governance and strategic planning, while building IT service management and project management best practices across the organization. She has overseen significant expansion of the campus wireless network, classroom technology upgrades, and the implementation of new information systems for finance, HR, procurement, development and alumni relations, and research administration. She has collaborated with the VP Research on the creation and development of the multi-institutional Massachusetts High Performance Computing Center, and with the Provost's Office on the BU Digitial Learning Initiative. Prior to joining BU, Tracy led the Department of Information Technology Services at the University of San Francisco (2002-2009) and served as president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities' Conference on IT Management (2007-2009). Tracy has a bachelor's degree from Stanford University and a master's degree from the University of San Francisco.

EDUCAUSE Publications

  • Enterprise IT Summit Follow-Up: What Is Effective IT Governance?
    • Blog

    The Leading Transformational Change session at the 2016 EDUCAUSE/NACUBO Enterprise IT Summit generated more audience questions than the panelists could answer in the time allowed. They address two of the outstanding questions through this blog. In this second posting, the panelists consider effective IT governance.

  • Enterprise IT Summit Follow-Up: What Should We Stop Doing?
    • Blog

    The Leading Transformational Change session at the 2016 EDUCAUSE/NACUBO Enterprise IT Summit generated more audience questions than the panelists could answer in the time allowed. They address two of the outstanding questions through this blog. In this first posting, the panelists consider what IT should stop doing.

EDUCAUSE Presentations